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Category: Primal Cooking

Cider-Braised Ham Hocks

Cider-Braised Ham Hocks

The hock is an often overlooked cut of pork. It is the portion of a pig below the ham or shoulders and above the trotter.

The hock is a tough muscle, lean muscle that requires slow cooking in order to a pleasurable eating experience. Given that it is a commonly used muscle, it is full of flavor, much like the ham.

Cider-Braised Ham Hocks

2017-04-01
: 4-6
: medium

By:

Ingredients
  • pasture-raised hocks
  • 1 cup of homemade chicken stock
  • 2 medium sweet potatoes chopped
  • 1 sliced onion and some celery
  • salt
  • and a certified organic dry apple cider with no added sugars
  • 2TBS butter
  • another cup of chicken stock
  • mustard - this is organic horseradish mustard
  • a diced shallot
  • heavy cream
  • and salt
Directions
  • Step 1 1. I get things going by sprinkling salt on all sides of the pork
  • Step 2 2. I put the hocks, two at at time, in my pre-heated and oiled enamel cast iron braiser for browning.
  • Step 3 3. I sear the top and bottom of the hock Once sufficiently browned, I remove the hocks and brown the other 2
  • Step 4 4. Next, I add the onion and celery with some salt. My goal is just to sweat them, not to caramelize
  • Step 5 5. Now it is time to add the sweet potatoes.
  • Step 6 6. With the sweet potatoes slightly softened, I add the hocks back to the braiser
  • Step 7 7. I add the chicken stock ….. and then the cider
  • Step 8 8. I lid the braiser and put it into a preheated over set to 325˚F for 2 hours.
  • Step 9 While the hocks are braising I prepare the the mustard cream sauce.
  • Step 10 9. To start the sauce, I melt the butter in a saucepan
  • Step 11 10. Next, I add the shallots and a pinch of salt
  • Step 12 11. Once the shallots are sweated, I add the chicken stock. If you want a thicker sauce, only add 1/2 cup
  • Step 13 12. Now I add about three spoons of mustard
  • Step 14 13. And then I add the cream – only about 1/4 cup or so
  • Step 15 14. I just let that simmer and reduce

After 2 hours in the over, the hocks should be ready.  I am serving the hocks over sautéed cabbage.  Once plating the hock I spoon both the vegetable cider mix onto the hock as well as the mustard cream sauce.  The sauce is a little thinner than I would have liked.  This could have been reduced further or I could have added less chicken stock.

Primal Pumpkin Pie

Primal Pumpkin Pie

Primal Pumpkin Pie from Scratch!

Two years ago, we made our first pumpkin pie from a fresh pumpkin, and we were hooked. We repeated it last year—but maybe with too much cardamom!—and this year, we’re testing out a couple of minor variations. This is a primal pumpkin pie—we use cream in it. Other people use coconut milk: use what makes you happy, but make sure it’s the right amount.
For this recipe, you’ll need a few ingredients

Crust
1.5 cups of coconut flour
Two tbs of honey
Four tbs of coconut oil—add more if your dough is too dry
Dash of cinnamon (more…)

Our Path to Making Sausage

Our Path to Making Sausage

Our Path to Making Sausage

“Look darling, they have bacon and sausage!” my wife exclaimed as we found a pork vendor at our local farmers’ market.
“Hmmm”, I thought. “Let me make sure”.
“Excuse me, sir. Can you tell me about your management practices for the pigs? You know, how are they raised?”
“Glad you asked! My pigs are all raised on pasture and receive a supplemental feeding of non-GMO grains and legumes – basically just peas and barley. I have a lot of wooded areas on the farm in which the pigs love to forage. I use permaculture practices to raise healthy, happy hogs!”

(more…)